How Can Change Be Effectively Implemented?

How Can Change Be Effectively Implemented?

This week we are exploring the idea of how we compare things around us, adapt to change, as well as the rate at which we prefer change in a specific area of our life. Knowing your own, or someone else’s pattern for change will guide you to the easiest path in effectively and gracefully bringing about any revisions. Pinpointing this ‘meta-program’ will bring great insight into the inner workings of a person, group or organization.

Do you notice similarities? Or are you drawn to what is different?

Mode of Comparison: Sameness ~ Sameness with Exception ~ Difference:

We each respond to change in a very different manner, which is obvious. What may be a little less apparent are the more subtle distinctions of how frequent our need for change is, and the best way to balance each individuals ‘meta-program’ for change within a relationship or in an organization (remember meta-programs change depending on the context).

Sameness pattern-You prefer things to stay the same and may refuse to adapt. You will look for those around you picking out the things you have in common, and feeling most comfortable in a familiar environment or situation. Every 15-25 years you will incite some sort of significant change.

Sameness with Exception-Even though you may notice what is the same, you then will right away identify the exceptions. You accept change regularly as long as it is not too dramatic. The preference for you is to have things change gradually. A larger change may be needed every 5-7 years.

Difference-You note what is different in a given situation. Static situations often need to be drastically altered about every 1-2 years. You may also find yourself mismatching what people say, typically pointing out a different perspective or approach.

In a large organization it can be very helpful to plan and implement any cultural changes to match the various patterns within the group, instead of a generalized approach, ultimately setting everyone up for success.

About the Author

Tim Hallbom

Tim Hallbom

Director of NLPCA -- NLP and Coaching Institute of California

6 Comments

  1. If you are working with people with such different modes and acceptances of change, it would be hard to implement a change that is necessary and still satisfy all of them it seems to me. I suppose this is one of the characteristics of people that may help put them in a job or position that is better suited to their personal thought processes.

    • Great comment! That is why MindSonar can really be an amazing tool for coaches and consultants! Even if you do not have the “characteristics” naturally, you can pinpoint exactly which meta-programs are needed in that context and develop them.

  2. I’m definitely a ‘sameness’ person. This is an interesting distinction and one I could probably learn a lot from. There are plenty of former superiors – bosses and such – that would’ve been able to get more out of me easily if they understood this. Ha. For team building, this definitely would help place people where they can function best.

    • Thank you for your note Robert. It’s too bad your “bosses” didn’t have a strategy for noticing that about you. Yes, MindSonar has been used a lot in the context of team building and enhancing each person’s strengths.

  3. Tim:
    In this era of change, where change is constant, and remain the same and survive? … As heighten the sense of internal locus of control ?, take risks change as templates to suit the changing environment? .. .. I find that propping the form of the satus quo, or managing change, or make significant leaps, could be designed together with 2 or 3 additional metaprogrammes keys? .. is that correct? …

    Congratulations!

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